Where Dog Training is Done Using the Brain, Not Pain 786-309-5109

Free Lecture: Portofino at Biscayne

Join in on Saturday, February 7th for a FREE “All about dogs” Q&A Session on dog behavior. All attendees will be entered into a drawing for a free one hour dog training consult and will receive 10% off any dog training service.

Free Lecture: Icon South Beach

Join in on Sunday, February 1st for a lecture on Canine Communication Signals: What you don’t know about what your dog is trying to tell you. All attendees will be entered into a drawing for a free one hour dog training consult and will receive 10% off any dog training service.

info@roccospack.com 786-309-5109

We adopted a 10-month old “shepherd mix” from the Miami Dade Shelter in November that had “awesome dog” scribbled all over his paperwork by the shelter staff. We couldn’t help but call him Radar due to his large pointy ears always at attention and always scanning for sounds. He came to us fully house-trained and understanding the sit command quite well.

We are experienced dog owners having owned a Lab who went through his terrible twos until he was four. We successfully turned him into one of the greatest dogs of all time on our own, but nothing from our past experience prepared us for Radar. This new awesome dog had a dark side. Incessant jumping up, nipping at the face and chewing inappropriate things are just a few of the behaviors that were driving us mad.

The worst was what we called “crazy hour.” After his supper, Radar would dig the carpet, whine, growl, and nip to get attention. We tried everything thing we could think of to settle him down with zero success.

Enter Leby.

She set us up with the tools we needed to turn Radar around. We started with more basic obedience: down, leave-it, drop-it, come, and walking on a leash. With Leby’s help we learned about marker (clicker) training, and it wasn’t long before Radar was starting to turn into an obedient dog.

Radar had another big problem. He would go into full attack mode while walking on a leash around other dogs, skateboarders, and bicycles. Again, Leby stepped in to help us down the road to counter conditioning this behavior. We worked for weeks on this a little at a time and ended up the last session with Leby shaking my wife’s hand with her Lab in tow and Radar sitting down looking in another direction.

Hooray Leby! Thanks for all the help. It’s been a couple of weeks now, and Radar is really starting to be the dog we want him to be.

Michael, Karen and Radar